Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment

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Our commitment

Reconciliation Action Plan

Ahpra’s Reconciliation Action Plan is an important document outlining what Ahpra will do to start addressing the imbalance in health outcomes between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and other Australians within our workplaces.

It is an important statement of our commitment to work in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to achieve patient safety for all Australians.

We are currently in the process of finalising our second Reconciliation Plan with Reconciliation Australia at an Innovate level.

Ahpra has a National RAP Working Group and local groups in every state and territory. These groups work towards the deliverables of the RAP and concentrate on engaging their offices with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture, events, communities and stakeholders – particularly related to health and regulation.

Ahpra Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2020-2025

Ahpra is committed to increasing the employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to ensure our workforce is representative of the community we serve. We seek to improve the cultural safety of the workplace, career experiences and opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.

The Ahpra Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Strategy 2020 – 2025 (Employment Strategy) is a key deliverable for the National Scheme’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020–2025.

The Employment Strategy contains five priority areas to help achieve our goal:

  • Build a sustainable talent pipeline through attraction and recruitment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates.
  • Implement programs and culturally safe work practices which foster the retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees.
  • Invest in developing the capabilities and careers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, including representation in leadership and senior roles.
  • Develop culturally safe workplaces through education and culturally safe work practices.
  • Know the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce throughout Ahpra to encourage their engagement in the delivery of the Employment Strategy and goals.

Recruitment support

Ahpra employs an identified Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Business Partner who can support you with your application and the recruitment process as well as being part of your support network once you start.

If you have any queries regarding a role or working at Ahpra in general, please do not hesitate to email Recruitment@ahpra.gov.au.

Potential opportunities

If there are no positions currently available that suit your skills and background, please apply for one of our talent pools. Our Recruitment team and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Engagement Business Partner will then work with you around possible opportunities.


Cultural safety at Ahpra

Cultural safety is generally regarded as an environment that is spiritually, socially, emotionally and physically safe for people; where there is no assault, challenge or denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need.

Ahpra and the National Scheme have responsibilities to protect patient safety and enhance healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. A major part of this is ensuring non-Indigenous health professionals have the necessary training and skills in practising culturally safe healthcare. This responsibility extends to all Ahpra staff and all Board and committee members.

To learn more about the National Scheme’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020-2025, click here.

Cultural safety training for all staff and Board members

One of the ways we are seeking to embed cultural safety in the agency is by implementing cultural safety training for all Ahpra staff, Agency Management Committee and all national, state, territory and regional Board members.

Cultural safety training provides information and the opportunity for you to hear and learn from the perspectives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and for you to reflect on your own behaviour and conscious and unconscious beliefs. It aims to result in insight and behavioural change. There is a definite value in having a face-to-face component in this training as it enables richer discussion and deeper interaction.

The tender for this training was awarded in 2019 to PwC Indigenous Consulting. A pilot with 63 participants was completed by 30 June 2020 and the full delivery of the training is starting in February 2021.


Days of cultural significance

At Ahpra we recognise a number of days of cultural significance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples:

  • Invasion Day/Survival Day/Day of Mourning26 January
  • National Apology (Anniversary)13 February
  • National Close the Gap DayUsually held on the third Thursday in March
  • National Sorry Day26 May
  • National Reconciliation Week27 May - 3 June
  • Mabo Day3 June
  • Coming of the Light Festival1 July
  • NAIDOC WeekNAIDOC Week is usually held in the first week (a Sunday to Sunday) of July that incorporates the second Friday – which historically was celebrated as ‘National Aboriginal Day’

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Strategy 2020-2025 artwork

Our Health

Building a culturally safe healthcare together and empowering the community to have access to equitable, culturally safe healthcare that is free from racism. Greater self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples to ensure community enjoy a health life enriched by strong living culture, dignity and justice.

by Keisha Thomason

Keisha Thomason is an Aboriginal Graphic Designer and Artist. Keisha is a proud Waanyi / Kalkadoon (Mount Isa, Queensland) and Chinese woman. Her artwork style is contemporary, influenced by her culture, identity and the modern world.